Mere, New York City, old enough to know better. Sort of a fandom/music blog, sort of a god-knows-what-but-at-least-it's-tagged-for-your-blacklist blog.

 

Benvolio: In love?

Romeo: Out.

Benvolio: Of love?

Romeo: Out of her favor where I am in love.

Benvolio: *looks into the camera like he's on The Office*

bewbin:

"the weather seems ruff today doesnt it Spot haha?""dont patronize me Greg"

bewbin:

"the weather seems ruff today doesnt it Spot haha?"
"dont patronize me Greg"

(Source: awwww-cute)

The idea of fan cultures, or “fandoms,” cultivating fan fiction writers began at the earliest in the 1920s with societies dedicated to Jane Austen and Sherlock Holmes, but took off in the late 1960s with the advent of Star Trek fanzines. The negative stereotype of fans today is that of obsessed geeks, like Trekkies, who love nothing more than to watch the same installments over and over… However, this represents a core misunderstanding of what it is to be a fan: that is, to have the “ability to transform personal reaction into social interaction, spectatorial culture into participatory culture… not by being a regular viewer of a particular program but by translating that viewing into some kind of cultural activity.” Henry Jenkins, a Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor and expert on fan culture, likens fan fiction to the story of The Velveteen Rabbit: that the investment in something is what gives it a meaning rather than any intrinsic merits or economic value. For fans who invest in a television show, book, or movie, that investment sparks production, and reading or viewing sparks writing, until the two are inseparable. They are not watching the same thing over and over, but rather are creating something new instead.

hoveringcat:

John Register (1939-1996) was an American artist, best known for painting melancholic interiors - rooms containing furniture but without human presence. 
When compared with artist Edward Hopper, Register said:
“With Hopper you witness someone else’s isolation; in my pictures, I think you, the viewer, become the isolated one.”
Found via SOCKS.

hoveringcat:

John Register (1939-1996) was an American artist, best known for painting melancholic interiors - rooms containing furniture but without human presence. 

When compared with artist Edward Hopper, Register said:

“With Hopper you witness someone else’s isolation; in my pictures, I think you, the viewer, become the isolated one.”

Found via SOCKS.